Between the lines

Mist surrounds the jagged edges of flysch on the Basque Coast in Spain. Flysch alternates thin and coarse layers of sediment, making for a dramatic landscape. But Your Shot photographer Fran Llano writes that the view is more than just aesthetic, it’s informational. “Layer by layer,” he says, “the rocks offer a unique vision of the geological features of this area, reading a rocky book full of information.”

Reblogged from National Geographic

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The maze


Marshlands in Cádiz, Spain, form intricate patterns where they meet salt flats. Your Shot photographer Aya O. took pictures from a small plane at sunset, circling back multiple times to get just the right shot in the sunset light.

Through the fire

In San Bartolomé de Pinares, Spain, residents celebrate the eve of St. Anthony’s Day with the Luminarias Festival. St. Anthony is the patron saint of domestic animals. One of the traditions of the festival involves riding or jumping horses through bonfires, which is believed to purify the animal and protect it in the year ahead. Townspeople say the practice dates back at least 500 years, coming from a time when smoke was thought to ward off the plague. Animal rights groups say the practice is cruel and barbaric, but the city government claims that no horse has ever suffered injury. 
Reblogged from National Geographic

Points of view

Spain’s Basque Coast, part of which is pictured here, is so full of stunning landscapes, such as karst cliffs that lead into the sea and are worn over millions of years into coastal rock strata like these, that the area has been added to the European and Geoparks Network, administered by UNESCO. Your Shot photographer M. Subirats made this image in Deba as dusk marked the closing of the day: “A pink sky was perfect to capture the beauty of the stones that sink into the horizon.”

Reblogged from National Geographic

Different Light

Sunlight beams through a stained glass window in the Mosque-Cathedral of Córdoba, spotlighting orbs of color onto an adjacent wall. This unique building in Spain is an important archaeological example of both Christian and Muslim influences: It was a mosque in the eighth century, during the period of Moorish conquest, but claimed as a Christian cathedral in the 13th century.

Reblogged from National Geographic