Going down


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Slippery when wet

Although sometimes it is just fun to roll around in the mud, a mud bath has its utility, serving to cool and protect against the sun and parasites. For this young male in Kenya’s Samburu National Reserve, hogging the wallow seems cause for exuberance.

 

Reblogged from National Geographic

Water trails

Birds take flight from Kenya’s Lake Bogoria, drawing dotted lines on the water’s surface as they ascend. The alkaline lake is notable for being a popular feeding spot for many bird species that feed on the lake’s rich supply of algae, especially the flamingos, which flock there by the tens of thousands. 

Reblogged from National Geographic

Stretch

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As ominously low clouds loom over the savanna, a lioness stretches—seemingly in no hurry to take cover—in Kenya’s Masai Mara National Reserve. The park is wildlife rich, and visitors to the popular safari destination could likely spot the “big five”: elephants, rhinos, buffalo, leopards … and lions.

Reblogged from National Geographic

A bug’s eye view

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Zebras gather at the Mara River on the Masai Mara National Reserve in Kenya. Your Shot member Manoj Shah, who submitted this photo, managed to capture a unique perspective of the herd. “This photo was taken by a special remote camera, developed so that it could be triggered from a distance. The camera was hidden where the zebras go to drink water and cross to the other side of the river … in a rocky place so that they would behave naturally, without any disturbance. The whole idea was to capture what an insect … would see when in the midst of the herd.”

Reblogged from National Geographic

That’s going to leave a mark

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I was lucky enough to see these two fighting zebras while crossing the Masai Mara in Kenya. We stopped our vehicle and watched as the two zebras bit, kicked, and otherwise pestered each other. The two crossed our path and then started kicking violently. I followed the pair and was able to capture this moment just before they split up and went their separate ways.

Reblogged from National Geographic

Framed

Randy Olson photographed the people and landscapes around Lake Turkana, the world’s largest permanent desert lake, for the August issue of National Geographic magazine. The lake sustains the tribes in Kenya’s remote north—but projects upstream threaten its lifeblood. Here, a man sells mirrors in the Kakuma Refugee Camp. Located a hundred miles from Lake Turkana, the UN camp holds 180,000 refugees who fled conflicts in Sudan, Somalia, and other nations.

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Photo Credit: Randy Olson on National Geographic