Waterfall portrait


http://yourshotblog.nationalgeographic.com/image/165726017969

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Blue ice

Pressurized ice, not privy to direct sunlight, sparkles a luminous blue deep in Breiðamerkurjökull ice cave. The cave is part of Iceland’s Vatnajökull Glacier, one of Europe’s largest ice caps, which began forming 2,500 years ago and sits atop several volcanoes. As a result, ebony often streaks the azure interiors.
Reblogged from National Geographic

A watershed moment

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Water in Iceland’s Ölfusá River flows around sandbars toward the Atlantic Ocean. The Ölfusá is Iceland’s largest river, and its watershed drains 2,355 square miles (or one-seventh of Iceland). According to a study by the University of Arizona, parts of Iceland are rising as much as 1.3 inches a year as its ice cap melts away.

Reblogged from National Geographic

Looking up

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An Iceland road trip afforded Your Shot member Dylan Shaw an opportunity to photograph one of the country’s geological wonders—a field of volcanic rock softened by a lush blanket of moss. Iceland has been shaped by glacial and volcanic activity—the island was born of a volcanic eruption—and has more than a hundred volcanoes, about a third of which are considered active.

Reblogged from National Geographic

Early morning

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“The place has its unique appeal,” Your Shot member Hardik Desai writes of Iceland’s Jökulsárlón glacier lagoon. “Dawn happens two hours before sunrise, and the sunrise colors usually last almost 90 minutes if there are no clouds.” A day after scouting out the location, Desai drove 30 minutes to arrive at the lagoon in time to capture the sunrise, hoping for exactly this result.

Reblogged from National Geographic

Waterfall

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Seljalandsfoss is one of the best known waterfalls in Iceland and it’s possible to walk behind it, but I gotta tell you the mist coming from it doesn’t make it that easy at all to take a picture! It’s pretty crazy! But the feeling you get when you get out of there all wet from head to toe with your gear is amazing!
This waterfall of the river Seljalandsá drops 60 metres over the cliffs of the former coastline.

Reblogged from fstoppers.com