What’s that smell

A male forest elephant in Gabon senses Nichols’s scent. 
Reblogged from National Geographic

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Two kayaks


Look closely: There’s more to this image than the frothy, rushing waters of the Columbia River Gorge and velvety green of the forest. Two bright kayaks are on the river, dwarfed by the surroundings. “This shot took a lot of planning and coordination,” Your Shot photographer Karim Iliya writes. The kayakers “had to hang out in an eddy and try not to move while I took long exposures with a drone. It needed to be at twilight so the light was balanced, which meant we only had one attempt.”
Reblogged from National Geographic

The boneyard

“We were going to visit the northeastern portion of the island, aptly named ‘the boneyard,’” says photographer and My Adventurer of the Year Instagram contestant Ezekiel Ogle of this photograph he took of his friend Harry Carlin on Boneyard Beach in Bull Island, South Carolina. “On this portion of the island, the forest is being slowly overtaken by the advancing ocean. As the ocean encroaches on the forest, the terrestrial plant life is killed by saltwater, leaving only the ‘bones’ behind. This provides a unique landscape in which the slow battle between the sea and land can be observed. The bare trees are left standing temporarily before they are inevitably swept away.”

Ogle discovered the tree earlier in the day and decided it would make an interesting photograph. He and his friend arrived at the spot just after sunset as the moon was rising. “As the moon reached a good height for casting long shadows, Harry mentioned that he would like to get a photo of him climbing the tree. His idea is what ultimately led to me get this image.”
Ogle’s part in making the image, he says, was way easier than what his pal had to do. “Harry had the difficult job of climbing the slippery, barnacle-covered tree and then holding still for 25 seconds while the exposure was captured. Not an easy job, I would imagine!”
Reblogged from National Geographic

Lantern

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While walking through the forest for a lot of hours and days I tried to find a way to bring the tiny things in those area to live much more. Sometimes the tiny things have so much power, beauty and awsomeness but still they are overseen by a lot of people.
With this series I want to give mushrooms a stage to show there whole beauty and elegance.

Reblogged from fstoppers.com

Thirsty forest

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“These baobab trees on Madagascar are up to 800 years old,” writes Your Shot member Marsel van Oosten. Locally known as “mother of the forest,” the baobab forms a micro-ecosystem of its own, supporting life for both animals and humans, van Oosten says. “Old hollow baobabs are a home to snakes, bats, bush babies, bees, and sometimes even humans. More importantly, the tree is an important source of water—it can store up to 4,000 liters of water in its trunk. For Africa, it is literally the tree of life.”

Reblogged from National Geographic

A tall story

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The town of Hilton in South Africa is known for its misty weather, which came out in full force for an annual mountain bike classic. The unusually wet winter’s day challenged competitors with muddy tracks, low visibility, and an icy wind. I battled to just keep my camera dry, and after failing to obtain sharp images through the haze, I took a step back and framed this shot, which captures the adventurous rider tackling the harsh environment.

Reblogged from National Geographic