Sand wave


Your Shot photographer Danny Sepkowski admits that setting up his camera on a shore break is “not the safest thing to do.” But he got this incredible shot of sand being sucked up into a wave by photographing with a 100mm lens. “Shooting with a macro lens has taught me patience and composition as well,” he says. “The detail that this lens has is next level, and so are the beatings that I take with it!”
Reblogged from National Geographic

Etosha Sunset

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This is a traditionnal Gnu (aka wildebeest) taken in Etosha NP (Namibia), a few kilometers on the road to Halali Camp. People are not allowed to stay outside after sunset (camp gates are closed for security) but watching the sun set in beautiful pink and orange hues made me slow down. As the sun was touching the horizon I stopped the car when I found a pleasing composition with the animal rendered as a silhouette and a little bush in front of him. This was shot from y car windows with a D810 + 500mm at f/4, resting on a beanbag. I returned promptly to camp as gates were closing.

Reblogged from fstoppers.com

Out of your shell

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I have heard that there is a rule in photography never to place your main subject dead center. But in my opinion there are no rules of composition in photography; composition should fit the subject matter. The impact of this photograph is the tortoise’s remarkable face. Also, by putting him right in the middle, we can admire both his symmetry, and his asymmetry: The crooked line of his mouth is what gives him character.

The giant size of the creature is implied by filling fully half of the top half of the frame with the shell. Because the focus is sharp on the face and slightly out of focus on the shell, the eye is drawn right to the middle, to the sharpness of the eyes and the texture of the face.

Reblogged from National Geographic

Just looking

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Shot that i’ve taken at the Oasi di Sant’Alessio, Pavia. Italy 2014. I took several shots in different positions, checking many point of views as possible, before finding the composition I was looking for. When caimans are immersed into the water two only parts of the body remain visible over the surface and these are eyes and nostrils. In this case I found that nostrils were just a disturbing element, that would just keep away the attention of the viewer from the magnetism of the eye.

Reblogged from fstoppers.com

Sometimes the worst weather makes the best shot

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Recipe Behind the Shot:

Three hours of wait for downpour to stop.
No telephoto lens to compress distance.
(Shot with Canon 100 mm Macro)
4 degree outside temperature.
Constant Spray of ice cold water.
A patient wife, agreeing to wait while I kept perfecting the composition.

Benefit of Worst Weather:

Less or almost no crowd, at one of the most popular place in Iceland.
Moody Atmosphere.

Lesson Learnt by Me:
No weather is bad weather.
Learn to Adapt and move on. 🙂

Reblogged from fstoppers.com

Sharp turn

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A wild barn owl flying over Norfolk reeds at dusk

What Makes This a Photo of the Day? I have an affinity for owls. Knowing that not everyone may feel as I do, I try to limit myself to one owl photograph per month, and I’m happy for the chance to run this one in February. The light is beautiful and the composition nicely balanced, with the owl punctuating the empty space above the reeds. —Alexa Keefe, Photo of the Day editor

Reblogged from National Geographic